Volume 2, Issue 4 (9-2017)                   J. Hum. Environ. Health Promot. 2017, 2(4): 234-244 | Back to browse issues page

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Izadi S. Sexual Health Education Resources in the Southeast of Iran. J. Hum. Environ. Health Promot.. 2017; 2 (4) :234-244
URL: http://zums.ac.ir/jhehp/article-1-120-en.html
Health Promotion Research Centre, School of Public Health, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
Abstract:   (370 Views)
Background: To determine the most usual resources that adolescents and teenagers are using to learn about sexual issues. A cross-sectional exploratory study implemented in June 2015 in Zahedan, the capital city of Sistan-va-Baluchestan Province, located in the southeast of Iran.
Methods: Using convenient sampling method, from among student of two large universities in Zahedan, 134 students 18 to 22 years old, accepted invitation for filling a self-administered anonymized questionnaire containing, 8 semi-closed questions about sexual issues.
Results: 44.9% of women and 41.6% of men mentioned one of their friends as their tutors. While 42.0% of women mentioned their mothers as one of their tutors, only 18.8% of them believed that more than 50% of their sexual knowledge came from their mothers. 23.1% of male participants and 36.2% of female ones alleged to know personally people of their own ages who had been subjected to sexual abuse or harassment earlier in their life.
Conclusion: In Iran, educating sexual issues to adolescents is badly in need of organization and management. While the rule of a committed extra-family tutor (e.g. an officially appointed school teacher) might not be considered a solution, parents have to be prompted for filling the gap.
 
Full-Text [PDF 449 kb]   (77 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Research Article | Subject: Special
Received: 2017/07/24 | Accepted: 2017/08/31 | Published: 2017/09/21

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