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Showing 6 results for گل محمدی

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Volume 1, Issue 1 (12-1992)
Abstract


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Volume 2, Issue 5 (12-1994)
Abstract


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Volume 2, Issue 7 (6-1994)
Abstract


Mr Jafari, S Golmohammadi, F Ghasvand,
Volume 14, Issue 57 (Dec 2006)
Abstract

Background & Objective: ‎Cannabinoids have a dose-related antinociceptive effect in animals and humans through Cannabinoid receptors (CB1,CB2). Several ‎studies have suggested that CB2 receptors are not expressed in the CNS but others suggest that there are a few, although significant, receptors in that area. To date no studies have been done on the antinociceptive effect of central administration of a CB2 agonist. In this study the central and peripheral analgesic effect of JWH133 (a CB2 agonist) was examined.‎ Materials & Methods: Male mice were used in this study. The antinociceptive effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of JWH133 ‎using formalin test was studied in stereotaxed mice after one week of ‎surgery and the insertion of a stainless steel cannula in the left cerebroventricle. To study peripheral effects of JWH133, the drug was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.). Results: The i.c.v injection of JWH133 had no effect but i.p. injection of the drug had analgesic effects. Conclusion: The present results may suggest that there are no any effective analgesic CB2 receptors in the CNS.


N Najafzadeh, M Nobakht, K Mansoori, A Niapour, Mg Golmohammadi,
Volume 20, Issue 83 (8-2012)
Abstract

Background and Objective: Spinal cord injury (SCI) has a high incidence rate in the world. However, until recently, there has been no reliable treatment available for its sensory and motor complications. Utilization of stem cells has opened new insights for treatment of SCI. Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) are multipotent, have high proliferative potential, and easily accessible. Here, we isolated HFSCs and transplanted them to Rats with spinal cord injury by compression model. Materials and Methods: HFSCs were isolated from the bulge area of Wistar rat whisker follicles. The SCI model was induced in 14 rats, and cultivated HFSCs were transplanted to the spinal cord lesion sites. Functional recovery was assessed by Basso–Beattie–Bresnahan (BBB) scale and muscular activity changes were evaluated with electromyography (EMG) 8 weeks following the transplantation. Results: Behavioral assessments with BBB test showed that scores in transplanted animals were higher than the control group. Functional recovery in the transplanted group were better eight weeks after transplantation (p=0.023) and BBB scores were 15.64 ±0.32 compared to 12.8 ±0.45 in the sham group. Moreover, the signal amplitude of the needle EMG records of the lower extremity muscles increased in transplanted rats. Conclusion: Our results show that transplantation of HFSCs to the site of SCI could be useful for repair and replacement of degenerated neuronal and glial cells.


M Golmohammadi, P Mansuri, M Jafari Javid, Hr Khalkhali, M Aghdashi,
Volume 21, Issue 89 (8-2013)
Abstract

Background and Objective: Hypotension associated with spinal anesthesia for cesarean section is still a clinical problem. The role of crystalloid preloading to prevent hypotension associated with spinal anesthesia in parturients during cesarean section has been challenged. However, studies with crystalloids predict that fluid loading should be more efficacious if administered immediately after induction of spinal anesthesia. The effects of colloid loading after spinal anesthesia in cesarean section have not been studied enough. The aim of this study was to compare pre and co-loading of hetastarch for the prevention of hypotension following spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial study was performed in 112 parturients (ASA I or II) undergoing elective cesarean section. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the two groups to receive rapid infusion of 500 ml of 6% hydroxyethylstarch (HES) before spinal anesthesia (preloading group, n = 56), or rapid infusion of 500 ml of HES after induction of spinal anesthesia (co-loading group, n= 56). The incidence of hypotension and the amount of vasopressor, (ephedrine 5 mg/mL + phenylephrine 25 micg/mL) were compared in the treatment of hypotension. Results: There was no significant difference in hypotension between the two groups (P = 0.58). The pre-loading group used 2.2 ± 1 ml of vasopressor mixture compared with 1.7 ±0.7 ml in the co-loading group (P = 0.04) and the difference was significant. Conclusion: Colloid loading after induction of spinal anesthesia is as effective as preloading in reducing hypotension in cesarean section.



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